With healthy cells – a healthy body

Ubiquinol helps in treatment using statins

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Monday, 03 August 2015 15:48
A fat-rich diet may increase cholesterol levels in the blood. People for whom statins have been prescribed also need to ensure they have a suitable supply of Ubiquinol (Kaneka).
A fat-rich diet may increase cholesterol levels in the blood. People for whom statins have been prescribed also need to ensure they have a suitable supply of Ubiquinol (Kaneka).

Food supplements to combat side effects

Many people take drugs that are called statins in order to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood. These 'fat reducers' can inhibit the formation of 'bad' cholesterol in the liver by preventing the enzyme necessary for cholesterol production from working. This enables the liver to absorb and metabolise more cholesterol in the blood. Too high a level of LDL, the 'bad cholesterol' in the blood is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders such as arteriosclerosis.


Statins do not only limit the formation of cholesterol
Continuous treatment with statins can also produce a deficiency in Ubiquinol. This is because, unfortunately, in the natural process for synthesising both cholesterol and Ubiquinol, our bodies use several steps that are common. Statins thus inhibit both the production of the undesirable form of cholesterol and that of the indispensable Ubiquinol.

 

Why do our bodies need Ubiquinol?
Coenzyme Q10 is like a vitamin for human cells. Normally, it is regularly transformed into its active form, Ubiquinol, which plays an important role in the production of cellular energy. The amount of energy produced is essentially proportional to the quantity of Ubiquinol in the cells. Muscles and organs, especially the heart and the brain, consume lots of energy and they need to have a constant reserve of such energy available be able to continue functioning correctly. With advancing years, usually from around age 40, the level of Ubiquinol starts to diminish. This causes the body to be less dynamic, tiredness appears more frequently and cells are less well protected from ageing. And if the production of Ubiquinol is also inhibited by statins this can quite quickly create a deficiency.

 

Treatment with statins may create side effects
Numerous patients undergoing statin treatment complain of undesirable daily side effects, such as tiredness, lack of vitality, and muscular pains and cramp. These same side effects are also observed when Ubiquinol deficiency is diagnosed. Studies have shown that the level of Ubiquinol in the blood decreases by between 25% and 50% after treatment with statins.


It seems clear that a supplement containing Ubiquinol will bring relief from side effects for those patients undergoing statin treatment. The required dosage will very much depend on each individual case. Good results are obtained in general with 100 mg per day. It is important to stress that Ubiquinol is a totally natural substance that is obtained for these purposes by fermentation of yeast. This particular form of food supplement is well-known as a perfectly safe therapeutic method without any side effects.

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